I Wish I Were Far From the Madding Crowd

March 28, 2010

Environmental exposures and child development

Came across several articles in Current Opinion in Pediatrics because of a blog post on Autism and environmental chemicals: a call for caution. Unfortunately, only the abstracts are free to view.

But what these show is that medical science is beginning to look more closely at possible environmental causes of childhood diseases.  This  does not mean that environmental factors in and of themselves cause disease, but as Dr. Philip Landrigan notes, genetic factors account for only a small fraction of autism cases and do not explain key features of autism.

What causes autism? Exploring the environmental contribution

Landrigan, Philip J.  Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 22(2):219-225, April 2010. doi: 10.1097/MOP.0b013e328336eb9a

Excerpts from the abstract:

Autism is a biologically based disorder of brain development. Genetic factors – mutations, deletions, and copy number variants – are clearly implicated in causation of autism. However, they account for only a small fraction of cases, and do not easily explain key clinical and epidemiological features. This suggests that early environmental exposures also contribute. This review explores this hypothesis.

Expanded research is needed into environmental causation of autism. Children today are surrounded by thousands of synthetic chemicals. Two hundred of them are neurotoxic in adult humans, and 1000 more in laboratory models. Yet fewer than 20% of high-volume chemicals have been tested for neurodevelopmental toxicity.

Environmental exposures and development

Mattison, Donald R. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 22(2):208-218, April 2010. doi: 10.1097/MOP.0b013e32833779bf

Excerpts from the abstract:

Summarizes recent studies exploring the relationship between paternal and maternal environmental exposures to chemicals before, at the time of and after conception to adverse developmental outcomes including preterm birth, death, structural and functional abnormalities and growth restriction.

Recent studies have demonstrated that human pregnancy and development are vulnerable to environmental exposures of the father and mother to chemical, biological and physical agents.

Whereas single genes and individual chemical exposures are responsible for some instances of adverse pregnancy outcome or developmental disease, gene-environment interactions are responsible for the majority.

Gene-environment interaction and children’s health and development

Wright, Robert O; Christiani, David. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 22(2):197-201, April 2010. doi: 10.1097/MOP.0b013e328336ebf9

Excerpt from the abstract:

Purpose of review: A systematic approach to studying gene-environment interaction can have immediate impact on our understanding of how environmental factors induce developmental disease and toxicity and will provide biological insight for potential treatment and prevention measures.

Summary: Using a genome-wide approach, combined with prospective longitudinal measures of environmental exposure at critical developmental windows, is the optimal design for gene–environment interaction research. This approach would discover susceptibility variants, and then validate the findings in an independent sample of children. Designs that combine the strengths and methodologies of each field will yield data that can account for both genetic variability and the role of critical developmental windows in the etiology of childhood disease and development.

Childhood obesity and the built environment

Galvez, Maida P; Pearl, Meghan; Yen, Irene H. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 22(2):202-207, April 2010. doi: 10.1097/MOP.0b013e328336eb6f

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