I Wish I Were Far From the Madding Crowd

April 11, 2010

Nature Deficit Disorder and National Environmental Education Week (April 11-17, 2010)

This week is National Environmental Education Week.  By teaching our kids more about the environment we will hopefully reduce Nature Deficit Disorder (this is NOT a medical condition, but is related to modern lifestyles).

NOTE: I have posted a number of these links on the “Parenting Resources” page.

Nature Deficit Disorder Resource Center (Education.com)

What is Nature Deficit Disorder?

from http://www.education.com/facts/quickfacts-ndd/what-is-nature-deficit-disorder/

A lack of routine contact with nature may result in stunted academic and developmental growth. This unwanted side-effect of the electronic age is called Nature Deficit Disorder (NDD). The term was coined by author Richard Louv in his book Last Child in the Woods in order to explain how our societal disconnect with nature is affecting today’s children. Louv says we have entered a new era of suburban sprawl that restricts outdoor play, in conjunction with a plugged-in culture that draws kids indoors. But, as Louv presents in his book, the agrarian, nature-oriented existence hard-wired into human brains isn’t quite ready for the overstimulating environment we’ve carved out for ourselves. Some children adapt. Those who don’t develop the symptoms of NDD, which include attention problems, obesity, anxiety, and depression.

Nature-deficit disorder is not a medical condition; it is a description of the human costs of alienation from nature. This alienation damages children and shapes adults, families, and communities. There are solutions, though, and they’re right in our own backyards.

Source: Johanna Sorrentino “Nature Deficit Disorder: What You Need to Know”; Richard Louv “Nature Deficit Disorder”

The site notes that

  • The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy statement in 2006 to pediatric health care providers on ways to increase physical activity in children and adolescents.
  • The authors stated that lifestyle-related physical activity, as opposed to aerobics or calisthenics, is critical for sustained weight loss in children, and recommended free, unorganized outdoor play as a method of physical activity.

[Ed. note: The above is from a post entitled “Is NDD linked to obesity?” It may be linked, but there are a lot of other factors beyond physical activity (or lack thereof) and diet.  But more on that in another post.)

Source: National Environmental Education Foundation. “Fact Sheet: Children’s Health and Nature

This fact sheet describes a number of recent research findings on the effects Nature Deficit Disorder might have on children’s health.

National Environmental Education Week, April 11-17th

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson encourages educators and students to get involved in National Environmental Education Week, April 11-17th. A week-long effort involving thousands of teachers and more than a million students, EE Week connects educators around the country with environmental resources to promote students’ understanding of the environment. Join EPA Administrator Jackson and take part in EE Week 2010.

Teaching resources

Highlights

EPA Resources

Environmental Education

http://www.epa.gov/education/index.html

National Environmental Education Act of 1990http://www.epa.gov/education/whatis.html

Federal Legislative Authorities for Environmental Educationhttp://www.epa.gov/education/flaee.html

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