I Wish I Were Far From the Madding Crowd

May 31, 2010

“Toxic America” special to air on CNN

CNN special on “Toxic America”

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2010/toxic.america/

Will air June 2 and 3 at 8 pm ET

http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/05/17/tune.in.toxic.america/index.html

Five toxics that are everywhere

http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/05/31/chemical.dangers/index.html

Bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, formaldehyde, PBDEs, PFOA

Releases of benzene, dioxin, lead, mercury, and trichloroethylene state by state

http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2010/05/health/map.toxic.chemicals/index.html

More info on access to government-held information on the environment, health, and safety can be found on the Right-to-Know Network website at http://rtknet.org.

March 25, 2010

The need for information about toxic substances in articles

For consumers to make informed decisions about whether the products we’re buying are safe, we need information about what is in them.  The following report discusses that issue.

Toxic substances in articles: the need for information
This report explores the benefits that can be gained by improving the provision of information on chemicals in articles.

Executive Summary (excerpt)

This report describes the problem of the lack of information on chemicals in articles. It illustrates specific cases where problems caused by chemicals in articles occur in all life cycle stages: manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal. The report explores the benefits that could result from the development of an internationally standardized information system for the chemical contents of articles; the challenges of disseminating such information; and existing models that could inform such a system. While an information system is not a substitute for other policy mechanisms to mitigate the harms from toxic substances in articles, it can be a powerful compliment [sic].

Note: This report was an input to the further development of the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM), adopted in February 2006, in particular to the objectives on knowledge and information (Objective 15) of its Overarching Policy Strategy and to some of the activities in the Global Plan of Action. The report was presented at an informal international workshop on stakeholders’ information needs on chemicals in articles in Geneva in February 2009.

The report was commissioned by the Swedish Chemicals Agency (KemI), with funding from the Nordic Chemicals Group under the Nordic Council of Ministers. Responsibility for its contents rests with the authors. The authors are Rachel I. Massey and Janet G. Hutchins at the Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Institute, Joel Tickner at the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production and Monica Becker, Monica Becker & Associates.

Contents

Understanding the Problem: Case Studies of Toxic Substances in Articles

  • Case Study 1: Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in waterproof  textiles
  • Case study 2: Lead in children’s toys and jewelry
  • Case study 3: Nonylphenol ethoxylates: Water contaminants from textile manufacturing and use
  • Case study 4: Toxic materials in personal computers
    Toxic materials in personal computers include lead, cadmium, mercury, beryllium, antimony, brominated flame retardants, perfluorinated compounds, and polyvinyl chloride plastic.
  • Implications for policies addressing information on substances in articles

Models for information management

Existing legal requirements for information on substances in articles

  • California: Notification of chronic health effects and Toxics Information Clearinghouse
  • Maine and Washington: Notification of toxics in children’s products
  • Mercury products legislation
  • Restriction on Hazardous Substances: EU and China
  • Management of Information on Chemicals in Articles under REACH
  • Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for Classification and Labelling of Chemicals

Voluntary systems

  • Industry-specific systems
  • Corporate Restricted and Preferred Substance Lists
  • Consumer-oriented Databases
  • Voluntary Environmental Performance Labelling (Eco-labels)

The way forward

  • Toward an Internationally Standardized System
  • Scope of the system

Read full report (PDF – 2.28 MB)

February 24, 2010

Back in the real world: Human exposure to environmental chemicals

Another type of exposure besides exposure to 24/7 connectedness that is probably affecting kids is exposure to industrial chemicals.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released its fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals. (Fact Sheet / Executive Summary – 874 KB / Full report – 18 MB)

CDC has measured 212 chemicals in people’s blood or urine—75 of which have never before been measured in the U.S. population. The new chemicals include acrylamide, arsenic, environmental phenols, including bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan, and perchlorate.  BPA was found in the urine of nearly all the people tested, a finding that indicates widespread exposure in the U.S. population.  Mercury, a known neurotoxin, was found in most of the study participants.

CDC notes:

Biomonitoring measurements are the most health-relevant assessments of exposure because they measure the amount of the chemical that actually gets into people from all environmental sources (e.g., air, soil, water, dust, or food) combined. With a few exceptions, it is the concentration of the chemical in people that provides the best exposure information to evaluate the potential for adverse health effects.

This is not a new issue.  Several years ago the Environmental Working Group released a report, Body Burden: The Pollution in Newborns, which measured industrial chemicals, pollutants, and pesticides in the umbilical cord blood of newborns.

287 chemicals were detected in umbilical cord blood, of which 180 cause cancer in humans or animals, 217 are toxic to the brain and nervous system, and 208 cause birth defects or abnormal development in animal tests.  The report notes that a number of human health problems are on the rise.  Fetal and childhood exposure can lead to childhood diseases or to diseases which don’t fully appear until adulthood.

So what can be done about this?

EWG has a blog on the Kid-Safe Chemical Act and the Environmental Defense Fund‘s Richard Denison has a blog on chemicals and nanomaterials.   EDF is also one of many organizations that has formed the “Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families” coalition, which is pushing for reforming the way the manufacture of industrial chemicals is regulated in the United States.  One of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s main tools for doing that is a relatively unknown law called the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).  The Safer Chemicals coalition presents a health case for strengthening TSCA.  (TSCA has actually been in the news quite a bit lately, so you might have heard about it.)

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